Soil and Cellar

Growing and preserving foods in Seattle


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Raspberry Picking

Raspberry-blueberry compote on waffles... an a-ok way to start a Sunday.

Raspberry-blueberry compote on waffles… an a-ok way to start a Sunday.

We woke up with a hankering to get out of the city. We planned to go on a hike, but I also wanted to tie in a trip to a fruit stand or farm. I’ve been SO busy this year and have barely had time to shop, let alone do any canning. Here I have 2 days to take on a small project or two, and I plan to take advantage!

Remlinger Farms berry picking... it was a gray day and I didn't get a great photo.

Remlinger Farms berry picking… it was a gray day and I didn’t get a great photo.

We decided to go “easy” and hit up Remlinger Farms, in Carnation, WA. It’s the big name berry farm out here, they sell berries and pies in all our grocery stores, they have a kids carnival area, and it’s pretty touristy. I was hoping they’d have flats of berries, but as we drove up saw they had raspberry picking, yay!

Picking boxes piled high... I guess it wasn't a very busy day at the farm.

Picking boxes piled high… I guess it wasn’t a very busy day at the farm.

It was kind of misty, and the berries were nearly at the end, but we found some great berries! There weren’t many easy pickins, but if you lifted branches or squatted down you could get a good selection.

There they are! Hiding...

There they are! Hiding…

Witness the bounty!

Witness the bounty!

After a half hour we had 2 pounds, which cost $4. A fun outing and cheap berries, works for me!

Here's our haul. The white bits aren't bad, just weird looking.

Here’s our haul. The white bits aren’t bad, just weird looking.

Not quite enough berries to make jam, and I’m not sure I have time to do that anyway. So instead, I froze most of them (to put on cereal, yum!)

I love my new refrigerator! It has the drawer freezer on the bottom, so I can now freeze in much larger batches than before.

I love my new refrigerator! It has the drawer freezer on the bottom, so I can now freeze in much larger batches than before.

and make a quick raspberry-blueberry compote for waffles this morning. Double yum!

Blueberries and raspberries cooked over medium heat, adding a little sugar if needed, basically until everything melts.

Blueberries and raspberries cooked over medium heat, adding a little sugar if needed, basically until everything melts. Eat on waffles!

I also got pickling cukes and late-season cherries, so I have a lot more projects to get to. Better get back to it!


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Lemon Curd with the Ladies’ Preservation Society

Waffles served with butter, lemon curd, and a little powdered sugar. Pure heaven!

Waffles served with butter, lemon curd, and a little powdered sugar. Pure heaven!

Oh yes. This is a real winner, let me tell you. You know the delicious lemony part of a lemon bar? That’s what this is, but you can put it on anything! Waffles! Popovers! Ginger snaps! Toast? I’m sure you could, but it might be a bit much for me, it’s quite sweet and rich.

We made this lemon curd for LPS in March (once again, I’m super behind.) It is a perfect recipe to do with friends. It’s one of those recipes (like many I post on here) that isn’t hard but has a lot of little steps. It’s great having helpers! And, frankly, I love sharing it at the end. The recipe is for freezing or refrigerating, not canning, so there’s a limited amount you can keep yourself.

Zest-ah zest-ah zest-ah!

Zest-ah, zest-ah, zest-ah!

We took the recipe from Saving the Season’s lime curd recipe, but we left out almost all the aromatics and spices, except ginger (and replaced lemons for limes, obviously.) Here’s our version:

Lemon Curd

Makes 6 quarter-pints

1 lb lemons
1 inch ginger root – peeled and chopped into large chunks
5 egg yolks
1 ½ cup sugar
2 sticks (8 oz) chilled unsalted butter, cut into chunks

The lighting was really cool back in March, and I just liked the way this lemon was backlit.

The lighting was really cool back in March, and I just liked the way this lemon was backlit.

Zest the lemons, to get about 3 Tbsp of zest. Juice the lemons, to get about ¾ cup juice. Strain. Combine zest, juice, and ginger in a bowl.

Juicing the lemons. After this, pour through a sieve, to remove seeds and pulp.

Juicing the lemons. After this, pour through a sieve, to remove seeds and pulp.

Using a double boiler on medium heat (I use a glass bowl over a pot of water), whisk together the egg yolks and sugar. Whisk in the mixture of lemon and ginger. Add the butter, and whisk, one piece at a time, until melted.

 

Ok, here we go. This part took the longest for sure, I'd say at least a half hour. You have to melt all the butter slowly, then cook for 10 minutes. But I'd say it took more like 15-20 for us to get to the consistency recommended.

Ok, here we go. This part took the longest for sure, I’d say at least a half hour. You have to melt all the butter slowly, then cook for 10 minutes. But I’d say it took more like 15-20 for us to get to the consistency recommended.

Stirring constantly, cook the curd for 10 minutes in this way. (Don’t let the curd boil, or the eggs will curdle. If that happens, pull off of heat and whisk vigorously.) The curd is done when it is as thick as heavy cream and coats a wooden spoon. Or, use a candy thermometer and cook until it is 170. You can also test the consistency by testing on a frozen plate. I think we got impatient on all these fronts so ours is a little runnier than may be ideal, but it’s still quite wonderful.

Filling jars.

Filling jars. Also – you can tell from the background this was Manhattans night. I had just been offered a job, so we were celebrating! Sadly, I was long since out of the brandied cherries I made last summer. I’ll be making those again as soon as I see cherries in the market!

Pour the curd through a fine sieve into a measuring cup, or something else you can pour from (this will make it easy to fill the jars.) Pour into 6 quarter-pint jars, or 3 half-pint jars that have been sterilized and kept warm. Seal and cool on the counter overnight. Then, store in the fridge and use within a month, or freeze for up to a year.

Now, how to use it? Well, my favorite thing was actually on waffles. It turned an already treat-like breakfast into straight-up dessert.

We dipped ginger snaps into the warm curd for an after-project treat. Nice!

We dipped ginger snaps into the warm curd for an after-project treat. Nice!


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Ramps for Breakfast

Spring veggies on display at Pike Place Market.

Spring veggies on display at Pike Place Market.

I have heard a lot about ramps in the last few years. These wild oniony garlicky beasts are darlings of chefs around the country. But I don’t feel like they grow wild here like they do out east. If they do, I’ve never heard of it, anyway. But after hearing so much about them and their mellow garlicky flavor, I wanted to try them! I think of them like this: Leeks are to onions as ramps are to garlic. Or something. Anyway, alliums are the best, and they are all welcome in my home!

Ramps washed and ready to cut.

Ramps washed and ready to cut.

My SIL and BIL were in town for a short weekend visit, and they’d never done the Pike Place Market. Now, Pike Place is one of the few tourist attractions that even Seattlites enjoy. And why not? We’re all about local fresh foods. We planning on wandering through the market and window shopping, but it’s hardly ever that simple. We ended up with some beautiful purple asparagus, ramps, some dried strawberries (yum!) pastries, yogurt, and salami.

Chopping. I love the rainbow effect on the stems! And you can see the purple asparagus in the background.

Chopping. I love the rainbow effect on the stems! And you can see the purple asparagus in the background.

Never having cooked ramps, I went with the standard for fresh veg – lightly sautéed and then scrambled with eggs. Throw a little cheese on top, and even the blandest veg are made super! Start with delicious veggies, and holy smokes, what could be better?

I sauteed the stems with the asparagus for a minute or two first, before adding the leaves. Then I wilted the leaves just so before adding the eggs.

I sauteed the stems with the asparagus for a minute or two first, before adding the leaves. Then I wilted the leaves just so before adding the eggs.

To top things off (because I like to pretend I run a B&B when I have house guests) I made popovers, which we ate with homemade jam (of course.) Voila! A perfect spring breakfast.

Now, don't you want to come visit?

Now, don’t you want to come visit?

Now that I’ve sampled them, next year I’ll look for ramps again. Any ideas how I should prepare them?


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Making Pretzels with Family

Mmm... salty crispy homemade pretzels.

Mmm… salty crispy homemade pretzels.

We go to Buffalo most Christmases. D is from Buffalo, and his parents still live in the same house he grew up in. (Which is wild to me, my Dad literally built my childhood home and we still moved out of it 10 years later!) It’s always great seeing the family, but I must say the cold wet gray of Buffalo isn’t exactly a great respite from the cold wet gray of Seattle. A group cooking project is a great way to bond and have fun without having to bundle up and venture outdoors.

St. Lawrence Market in Toronto, the morning of an ice storm. A great way to come in out of the cold!

St. Lawrence Market in Toronto, the morning of an ice storm. A great way to come in out of the cold!

D and I took a weekend trip up to Toronto. We walked to the St. Lawrence Market, which D told me National Geographic rated the BEST FOOD MARKET IN THE WORLD. When he said that, it was all over, there was no chance we were going anywhere else. I mean, I live within a couple miles of Pike Place Market, and it’s supposed to be better than that? Sign me up. Well, it is great, but I would love to go another time of the year to see if there is more produce. But they do have cheese like crazy, olives, meats and seafood (if you’re into that kind of thing), spices, mustards, jams… all delicious and amazing. We had a fantastic, deceptively simple lunch of egg and cheese sandwiches, sampled foods, and came home with bread, cheeses, a terrine, and a delicious mustard. That mustard will appear again in this post…

My new mustard purveyor - Kozlik's. We tasted them all, and it was genuinely hard to decide. We got honey-garlic, but a close second was the balsamic fig.

My new mustard purveyor – Kozlik’s. We tasted them all, and it was genuinely hard to decide. We got honey-garlic, but a close second was the balsamic fig.

Back in Buffalo, the snow was falling, and our pace slowed a little. Lucky for me, my mother-in-law and sister-in-law are great cooks who enjoy sharing the kitchen. Upon D’s suggestion, we decided to make pretzels one afternoon. It might have been Christmas day, and it was a lovely afternoon of baking with friends and family.

The recipe is easy, but it takes a little prep time and planning, because it is a yeast bread and needs to rise a bit. (Although I’ve never had to do the twisting, that part looks a little hard). These pretzels make an incredible snack, and would go great with a beer. We keep saying we’ll be doing it for game night, but keep forgetting. It’s a great communal project, fun and with a great reward at the end! I will caution you against making them alone the first time… D and I ate all of them in one day (with this cheese dip) and felt ill. But they are so good you will want to eat as many as you can get your hands on!

We use this recipe from Alton Brown:

1 1/2 cups warm tap water
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 package active dry yeast
22 ounces all-purpose flour, approximately 4 1/2 cups
2 ounces unsalted butter, melted
Vegetable oil, for bowl
Cooking spray, for pans
10 cups water
2/3 cup baking soda
1 large egg yolk beaten with 1 tablespoon water
Pretzel salt (we couldn’t find this, so used large crystal sea salt)

Kneading the dough for the pretzels.

Kneading the dough for the pretzels.

Combine water, sugar, salt, and yeast packet in a bowl. Let this sit for about 5 minutes, or until the yeast starts to foam a bit. Add the flour and butter, and mix using a dough-hook attachment for about 4-5 minutes, until dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. (We didn’t have a stand mixer, so my SIL kneaded the dough for about 8 minutes, like a trooper.) Remove dough from bowl and coat the bowl with vegetable oil. Then return the dough the the bowl, cover bowl with saran wrap, and let sit in a warm place for an hour – until the dough has doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 450. Line 2 baking pans with parchment and spray with cooking spray.

Ready the water and baking soda, and bring to a boil.

Action shot! The gang twisting the dough into long ropes. It helps to let gravity do some of the work.

Action shot! The gang twisting the dough into long ropes. It helps to let gravity do some of the work.

Oil a work surface (we used the counter) and divide the dough into 12 equal pieces (the original recipe says 8. We had 6 people so wanted to have an even number of pretzels per person. You can adjust as you like.) Roll each piece into a long rope about a half inch thick, about 24″ long. The dough might rebound so go back and stretch as needed.

Make the ropes into a “U” shape. Hold the ends off the counter, twist, and press onto the bottom of the U, making it look like a pretzel. It’ll take some practice, I hear, but lopsided pretzels taste just as good!

Dip the pretzels into the boiling water. This makes them chewy (like bagels), and the baking soda gives them that classic "pretzel" taste.

Dip the pretzels into the boiling water. This makes them chewy (like bagels), and the baking soda gives them that classic “pretzel” taste.

Put the pretzels into the boiling water/baking soda, one at a time, for 30 seconds each. Remove, and put onto the parchment lined baking tray. Give an inch or more of space between each pretzel.

Here the pretzels have been boiled, egg-washed, and sprinkled with salt. Ready for the oven!

Here the pretzels have been boiled, egg-washed, and sprinkled with salt. Ready for the oven!

Make egg wash with one yolk and a little water. Brush each pretzel (this will make them brown beautifully.) Then sprinkle with salt. More is better, in my opinion, because you can always brush it off later, and some people like them really salty.

Bake about 12 – 14 minutes, until a rich brown color. Cool on a cooling rack at least 5 minutes, and enjoy!

All done! And they only have to cool for a couple minutes, unlike other breads, so you can enjoy right away while still warm!

All done! And they only have to cool for a couple minutes, unlike other breads, so you can eat them warm!

We like them plain, or with cheese dip, as I mentioned above, or with mustard. The mustard we had is garlic honey mustard, sweet and very spicy, but a really wonderful flavor.

A little of this spicy mustard goes a long way. Enjoy!

A little of this spicy mustard goes a long way. Enjoy!

Happy New Year to you all! I count this blog, and you readers, in my blessings. I hope you have a year filled with fun projects, exciting adventures, and just plain pleasant times with friends and family.


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Popovers – the best way to eat jam!

Popovers, ready to eat! The left has peach with cardamom jam, and the right has strawberry jam.

Popovers, ready to eat! The left has peach – cardamom jam, and the right has strawberry jam.

I’ve made a lot of jam this year. I mean, a lot a lot. Combine my obsession with learning to can, love of making jam, trying to use seasonal fruits… I have basically infinite jam in my basement right now. I will be giving a lot out as holiday gifts (hi everyone!), but D and I will be eating much of it ourselves.

I try to find fun ways to use jam, like in baked goods, or with cheese at parties. But mostly, I eat it the way God intended – on toast.

But the best way of all to eat jam is on popovers. I make popovers every few months. They’re for special occasions, like Sunday morning football, or when you have houseguests. It’s not a hard recipe, not by any stretch, but if we each ate 6 popovers a weekend, well. That’s just not healthy. And they don’t keep, so you have to be ready to eat them all the same morning.

Popovers, just put in the oven.

Popovers, just put in the oven. Wait till you see what comes next!

Popovers (and their brothers in another world, Yorkshire pudding), are the coolest thing you’ll ever bake. Their name is apt, they puff up so much they pop over the sides of the pan! They’re terribly fun to watch grow in the oven, but the best part is eating them. Buttery, eggy, crispy, light and fluffy.  Add a little jam, and you’ve got yourself an amazing breakfast treat.

I’ve played around with different recipes and different pans for years. I even bought a special popover pan from Williams Sonoma. That pan failed me, but it did give me a recipe that I like.

Here they are at the time I turn the temp down, a little more than half done.

Here they are at the time I turn the temp down, a little more than half done.

Popovers (adapted from the one that came on my popover pan)

Makes 12 popovers. This recipe can easily be doubled if you have more people to feed.

2 Tbsp salted butter, melted
3 eggs, lightly beaten
1 cup milk
1 cup AP flour
½ tsp salt
Cooking spray with flour in it*

Preheat oven to 450 F.

Spray muffin tin with cooking spray that contains flour (I use Pam Baking).

*This step is really important, as otherwise the popovers stick in the tin, and you kind of ruin them getting them out. Even regular cooking spray and butter were trouble for me. It’s the only thing I use this type of Pam for, but it’s worth it. I gave up on popovers for two years before I learned this trick from Nadine (a friend, who also blogs at Delicious Nadine), and she was right!

Add a couple drops of melted butter to each muffin cup, as well.

And here they are, all ready to eat! You can almost feel the crispiness, can't you!

And here they are, all ready to eat! You can almost feel the crispiness, can’t you?

Whisk together milk and eggs. Mix in remaining melted butter (about 1 Tbsp). Add flour and salt, and whisk together until smooth, about 2 minutes.

Pour the batter into the muffin cups, filling each one about 2/3 full.

Cook at 450 for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 325, and cook for 8 more minutes.

Remove from muffin tin onto a cooling rack or plate. Eat as soon as possible, they deflate by the minute as they cool. They are still delicious deflated, but it’s fun to tear them apart while they are light and fluffy.

Resting on the rack. We have to take turns choosing, because some come out fluffier than others :)

Resting on the rack. We have to take turns choosing, because some come out fluffier than others 🙂

Serve with jam, and enjoy!

I just told D that I was writing this post. Then on what I thought was another track, asked what he’d like for Sunday’s breakfast. He said, shockingly, “popovers!” so I’ll be making them this weekend. And to go with it, the jams that are currently open are the peach-cardamom jam that my friend made, strawberry jam that I made, and some pomegranate-raspberry I made with the Preservation Society the other day (post coming soon.) Yay!


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The End of Farmers Market Season

Beautiful veggies at the Vashon Farmer's Market.

Beautiful veggies at the Vashon Farmers Market.

Well, my favorite farmers market – in Columbia City – is officially closed for the season. I say favorite, but of course what I mean is the one that’s closest to my house. There are others that are still open, but they involve more of a special trip. One such trip D and I took last week was to the Vashon Farmers Market. All the growers are on Vashon Island, which is so cool.  While I missed the Yakima peaches, etc, it’s kind of great to see the amazing array of fruits and veggies you can grow in Western Washington.

vashon farmers market

Small but awesome, the Vashon Farmer’s Market is the epitome of local.

Anyway, in honor of the last days of summer, and sort of an intro to harvest season and the holidays, here is a list of dishes I’ve made in the last few weeks from the Farmers Market bounty. You’ll notice a theme of roasting and root vegetables. Yep, fall. (Sorry I don’t have pictures of everything, I wasn’t planning this post ahead of time.)

Sweet meat squash - I think we paid $12 for this, it's so heavy! I love the bluish skin.

Sweet meat squash – I think we paid $12 for this, it’s so heavy! I love the bluish skin. I had to use a saw to cut it.

Roasted Sweet Meat Squash – from our Vashon adventure. This is a delicious squash with blue/gray skin, it’s really sweet so doesn’t need anything but salt and pepper, and it is huge! I froze 2/3 of it after roasting. There will be soup in our future.

Roasted beets – D doesn’t like these, but our schedules haven’t lined up much lately, so I’ve eaten these as leftovers for dinner multiple nights now.

Yummy breakfast!

Yummy breakfast – Ranchero eggs!

Ranchero eggs (from the Smitten Kitchen Cookbook) – a great Sunday morning pre-football breakfast. I used peppers and onions from the Vashon farmers market.

Honey roasted root vegetables - everything but the oil and salt is from a farmer's market (even the honey, which we bought at a farm stand in Stehekin).

Honey roasted root vegetables – everything but the oil and salt is from a farmers market (even the honey, which we bought at a farm stand in Stehekin).

Honey roasted root vegetables (carrots, turnips, rutabagas, shallots, mixed with honey and olive oil, and salt.) Delicious, makes a lot, and is pretty sweet, so makes a great side dish for potlucks or dinner parties. Originally from Cooking Light.

Potato leek soup – This is one of my favorite soups, so rich, with like 4 ingredients. Don’t you love that? Just cook the leeks and potatoes in some oil, then cover with veg stock and cook until it’s all mushy, then blend it. Voila! And I made extra to freeze, so I’ll have this delicious easy dinner again soon.

Beautiful display of quince at the Vashon Farmer's Market.

Beautiful display of quince at the Vashon Farmers Market.

Quince and star anise jelly – check back soon for the details on this one. (It’s a 3-day recipe, which of course I didn’t notice when I started, but just finished it and it’s really awesome.)

Oven roasted cherry tomatoes – for the crazy times when you can’t or don’t eat all the cherry tomatoes raw, roast them at 200 degrees for 3 hours, sliced in half, with a little olive oil and salt. Fabulous in pastas. ALSO, I learned from Rachel Ray a quick way to slice cherry tomatoes or grapes. Take two yogurt or cottage cheese lids, the same size, pack the tomatoes in one, place the other on top, and run your serrated knife between them. So fast!

Braised kale, a delicious way to get all those vitamins!

Braised kale, a delicious way to get all those vitamins!

Braised kale – D and I are people who actually like kale (and other greens), and we eat it this way about once a week this time of year. Usually I simmer with garlic in a tiny bit of oil and add a little veggie stock every 3-5 minutes, just to cover the bottom. As the stock reduces it also seasons the kale. After 15-30 minutes of this (depending on how soft you like your greens) they are delectable and go with just about everything. This time, though, I didn’t have any stock (!) so just used oil, and I really liked the results.

And thus, fall has begun. I do love fall veggies, but I miss the bright light flavors of summer fruit already. Good thing I’ve packed so much of it away in jars in my basement!


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Foraging for Fruit

Himalayan blackberries

Himalayan blackberries

Every year, we go with a group of friends that live near a greenbelt to a spot with tons of wonderful berries. Last year we got like 10 pints of  berries. We made blackberry cobbler, and all of us had enough to take home and freeze.  This year, only three of us could go, so we thought we’d all have even more per family! I planned on making jam, freezing, and baking. I asked D to take pictures the whole way to document the day.

Heading into the greenbelt for our foraging adventure! Note my giant bag ready for filling. Optimist!

Heading into the greenbelt for our foraging adventure! Note my giant bag ready for filling. Optimist!

These are all the berries we picked last year. See why I was excited?

Last year’s haul – see why I was excited?

In Seattle, and I imagine over much of the rest of the country, late summer means blackberry picking. The Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus) is violently invasive, and takes over roadsides, empty lots, and natural areas. The only benefit is that they produce some pretty tasty fruits.

Rubus armeniacus leaves.

Rubus armeniacus leaves.

Here in the Pacific Northwest, we also have 2 other blackberries, the invasive evergreen blackberry (Rubus laciniatus) and the native trailing blackberry (Rubus ursinus). Both of these have delicious fruits, but are generally less common than the Himalayan, and don’t produce fruits in the same quantities.

Rubus laciniatus - evergreen blackberry. This one has deeply divided leaves and purple stems.

Rubus laciniatus – evergreen blackberry. This one has deeply divided leaves and purple stems.

Rubus ursinus - trailing or California blackberry. This one has trifoliate leaves, and thin whitish stems. It's generally on the ground, or winding through shrubs.

Rubus ursinus – trailing blackberry. This one has trifoliate leaves, and thin whitish stems. It’s generally on the ground, or winding through shrubs.

Well. That bounty from last year was nary to be found this weekend. Because of the warm spring and summer, all fruits have been earlier than normal this year. Up until last week there was probably a boatload of perfect fruit on the vine. But last Thursday we had heavy rain, it lasted all day, and it seems to have destroyed the whole dang crop.

It's starting to dawn on us that our trip may not be as fruitful (ha) as we had hoped, but we weren't ready to give up yet!

Our first spot – here it started to dawn on us that our trip may not be as fruitful (ha) as we had hoped, but we weren’t ready to give up yet. We’re only halfway to the best patch, it must be better there!

We started at one spot (above), had no luck, went to the next and the next, and after 2 hours we had just over a pint of acceptable berries. Darn! They were either squishing in our hands as we picked them (over ripe) or too hard, or mummified with rot. Fruit flies were even on some of the best looking fruits, a sure sign that they were starting to ferment.

A common sight this weekend - what look like good berries are starting to rot on the vine. The other berries probably won't ripen this year. What a bust!

A common sight this weekend – what looked at first like good berries were starting to rot on the vine. The other berries probably won’t ripen this year. What a bust!

We did have a lovely hike, of course. And with what appears to be divine intervention, we found plums. Tons of plums! In the greenbelt there’s a little grove of plum trees, probably an old orchard, that have all reverted. Normally there are one or two plums dangling within reach and a few rotting on the ground.

There were yellow and red plums. Most of the red ones were mush, so I mainly picked yellow ones. (Note the trailing blackberry in the shot).

There were yellow and red plums. Most of the red ones were mush, so I mainly picked yellow ones. (Note the trailing blackberry on the right). Most of these were bad, too, but I rummaged around until I filled a pint.

Saturday there were a bunch within reach (with the help of a little light shaking), and many on the ground looked like they had JUST fallen. I scoured the lot for the best plums, and got about a pint. They aren’t big, but are quite delicious. (I have some pears that I bought on a trip to the country the next day, and I’m brainstorming what to do with them both.)

Here's the bounty from this year! I'm not about to complain, they are still great, but quite a difference from last year.

Here’s the bounty from this year! I’m not about to complain, they are still great, but quite a difference from last year.

We ended up making a smaller cobbler than normal, and had to include frozen berries plus a couple apricots and plums, just for good measure. It was delicious! And since there were only 3 of us, we even had leftovers. I’m sorry we won’t be enjoying the fruits of our labors for the rest of the year, though. I may see if I can buy some berries at the farmer’s market this year, because blackberry jam is my very favorite.

Still worth it... we made "kitchen sink" cobbler - blackberry, blueberry, raspberry, apricot, plum. Topped with ice cream... yum!

Still worth it… we made “kitchen sink” cobbler – blackberry, blueberry, raspberry, apricot, plum. Topped with ice cream… yum!